Lesson Plans

Daily lesson plans are a common requirement for most teachers. School administrators may ask to view these plans occasionally or you may have a set submission schedule. Schools with low staff availability may not ask to see your plans at all because there just isn't enough time to do it. No matter the expectations at your school, you need lesson plans in order to teach effectively. Lesson planning can be incredibly time consuming so instead of wasting your time on mindless work, concentrate on these three essential lesson plan components:

Subject Matter and Objectives. The most important part of your lesson plan is what you are going to teach. Define the subject matter of your lesson and then decide what the best way to teach it is. Once you have done this, you should make sure that your topic and strategy matches the objectives of your course and state requirements. Once you begin to align your standards you may have to adjust your topic and/or strategies so make sure you are open to changing your original plan.

Materials. In addition to the discussion of what will be taught and how you will teach it, include the list of materials you will need for the lesson to be successful. This should be specific in case you are absent and a substitute must perform your lesson plans for you. Include the title of any handouts that will be used and also include other materials that may be needed such as loose leaf paper, pens, pencils, markers and other supplies.

Teacher Notes. This section of your lesson plans is for reminders to yourself and for substitutes who may have to use the lesson plans. You may include subject matter notes or a brief note about classroom procedures which must be followed for the task to be successful. Including this section at the bottom of your write up makes it easy to identify in the middle of a class so make sure to leave plenty of room for it on all of your plans.

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Lesson Information